Cat scratch disease

Fact Checked

Cat scratch disease is caused by the bacteria Bartonella henselae from scratches or bites from cats. Fleas spread these bacteria to cats. They live in the saliva of an infected cat, but do not cause sickness to the cat.

Cat scratch disease is characterized by red tender papules or pustules at the area where a cat has scratched, licked and bitten a person. Eventually it becomes a painful small bump under the skin. Sometimes, it can cause a low-grade fever about 101 F. A weakened immune system puts one at high risk for developing the disease.

Symptoms of cat scratch disease

  • Fatigue
  • Swelling lymph nodes at the bitten or scratched area
  • Bump or blisters
  • Headaches
  • Body aches
    Cat scratch disease

    Cat scratch disease is characterized by red tender papules or pustules at the area where a cat has scratched, licked and bitten a person.

  • Low-grade fever usually above 98.6 F or 37C
  • Loss of appetite
  • Sore throat
  • Weight loss

Treatment

  • Prescribed antibiotics to lessen the infections caused by cat scratch or bites.
  • Fill a glass with warm water and then add a pinch of salt and baking soda. Mix them well until they are totally dissolved. Drink the solution at least 1-2 times every day to flush out toxins in the body and lessen the pain and the swelling.
  • Wash and disinfect hands properly before touching the wound. Use soap and warm water in washing the hands for at least 20 seconds and then rinse the hands using clean water.
  • Rinse the wound and areas around it in clean running water. Avoid using hot water to prevent worsening of the bleeding. Wash the affected area using a mild soap. Rinse the area using running water from the faucet. Avoid scrubbing the wound during washing to prevent further irritations and worsen the condition.
  • Apply prescribed antiseptic ointment to lessen the pain and for fast healing of the affected area. Avoid covering the area, keep it exposed to fresh air until it heals.

Deep wounds

  • Stop the bleeding by applying pressure on the area using a clean towel. Gently press the towel on the bleeding area until the bleeding becomes lessened.
  • Elevate the affected area above the head to lessen the pain and inflammation. It also increases flow of blood in the area.
  • Cover the area using an adhesive bandage or clean dressings. If the wound is wide, use a butterfly bandage to close the edges of the wound and for fast healing of the area. Butterfly bandages are used for closing major cuts and deep lacerations. Another alternative is using gauze dressing and secure it with a medical tape.
  • Prescribed oral antibiotics to prevent the risk of infection. Signs of infected wound include severe pain, redness, swelling and warmth around the wound; oozing pus from the wound; red streaks spreading from the affected area and having a high fever.

FACT CHECK

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cat-scratch_disease

https://www.healthline.com/health/cat-scratch-disease

https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/214100-overview

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  • All standardfirstaidtraining.com content is reviewed by a medical professional and / sourced to ensure as much factual accuracy as possible.

  • We have strict sourcing guidelines and only link to reputable websites, academic research institutions and medical articles.

  • If you feel that any of our content is inaccurate, out-of-date, or otherwise questionable, please contact us through our contact us page.